Aniline dyeing: The process of dyeing the hide with transparent dyes which penetrate the cell layers throughout. This process produces deep, vibrant colors while simultaneously preserving the unique characteristics and natural markings of the hide. This process could be compared to staining wood as opposed to painting it.

Bridle Leather: Using only the highest quality hides, bridle leather goes through an intensive finishing process that involves adding special oils, grease and wax polishes to coat the top layers. This deepens and evens the color, while also maintaining a smooth finish. This leather is comfortable enough to wear on the face of a horse, but also tough enough to withstand heavy repeated use while repelling sweat and dirt.

Burnish: A finishing technique used on the edges of leather which turns a rough surface into a smooth, shiny, darkened edge.

Calfskin: Leather derived from young bovines, which provides a finer grained, lighter and more supple leather than that from an older cow.

Chrome Tanning: Leather tanned with chromium salts, and/or chromium sulfate, as opposed to vegetable tanning, which uses natural tannins found in tree bark and other plants.

Crocking: The transfer of color and oils from dyed leather.

Deerskin: Deer and elk skins wherein the grain remains intact.

Embossing: The use of pressure to impress into the leather a texture in imitation of full grain. Embossing is also the process of using heat and pressure to impress monogrammed initials into leather.

Fat Liquors: An emulsion of oils and greases in water, typically with an emulsifying agent, used to lubricate the fibers of the leather.

Fat Wrinkle: Fat deposits in the animal cause fat wrinkles on the surface, a sure sign of a healthy, well fed animal. These wrinkles are visible most in full grain leather.

Full Grain: A term used to describe a hide that has had the hair removed, but otherwise has not been sanded, buffed or corrected in anyway. Full grain leather is the strongest, finest grade of leather made from the outer most part of the hide, therefore showing any wrinkles and marks. Over time these marks are enhanced by wear and develop a rich, unique patina.

Goatskin: Skin from a mature goat.

Grain: The texture and pattern of a hide’s surface.

Lambskin: Skin from a lamb or young sheep.

Leather: The skin of an animal that has been treated, dressed and preserved.

Patina: The resulting appearance of leather over time. Knicks, scrapes, bumps, friction and pressure, oils coming to the surface and receding, all cumulatively give each piece of leather a unique appearance.

Skiving: Slicing, shaving, or splitting leather into a thin layer, especially in areas where pliability is desired without weakening the leather.

Split Grain: When splitting the leather, two pieces are created: the top grain, and the split grain, which is the lower, weaker half of the hide. Often times this leather is pigmented and embossed to imitate full grain leather.

Suede: The buffing process used on split leather, which creates a nap.

Tannery: The place in which animal hides are tanned and processed.

Tannin: Astringent substances of plant origin used in tanning leather.

Tanning: The treatment of animal skins that prevents decomposition, as well as increases durability. This process permanently changes the protein structure in the hide, and can take between 6 hours and 2 days.

Top Grain: Typically used to describe the outermost leather of a hide, when the hide has been split. Often, top grain leather has had the original grain removed and an imitation grain embossed into the surface, both minimizing blemishes and increasing color uniformity. This also creates a lighter, more consistent leather that is easier to clean.

Vegetable Tanning: The application of tannins, derived from tree bark and other plants, to animal hides to create a firm and strong leather, as opposed to chrome tanned leather, which uses non-plant derived chemicals to treat the hides.

Aniline dyeing: The process of dyeing the hide with transparent dyes which penetrate the cell layers throughout. This process produces deep, vibrant colors while simultaneously preserving the unique characteristics and natural markings of the hide. This process could be compared to staining wood as opposed to painting it.

Bridle Leather: Using only the highest quality hides, bridle leather goes through an intensive finishing process that involves adding special oils, grease and wax polishes to coat the top layers. This deepens and evens the color, while also maintaining a smooth finish. This leather is comfortable enough to wear on the face of a horse, but also tough enough to withstand heavy repeated use while repelling sweat and dirt.

Burnish: A finishing technique used on the edges of leather which turns a rough surface into a smooth, shiny, darkened edge.

Calfskin: Leather derived from young bovines, which provides a finer grained, lighter and more supple leather than that from an older cow.

Chrome Tanning: Leather tanned with chromium salts, and/or chromium sulfate, as opposed to vegetable tanning, which uses natural tannins found in tree bark and other plants.

Crocking: The transfer of color and oils from dyed leather.

Deerskin: Deer and elk skins wherein the grain remains intact.

Embossing: The use of pressure to impress into the leather a texture in imitation of full grain. Embossing is also the process of using heat and pressure to impress monogrammed initials into leather.

Fat Liquors: An emulsion of oils and greases in water, typically with an emulsifying agent, used to lubricate the fibers of the leather.

Fat Wrinkle: Fat deposits in the animal cause fat wrinkles on the surface, a sure sign of a healthy, well fed animal. These wrinkles are visible most in full grain leather.

Full Grain: A term used to describe a hide that has had the hair removed, but otherwise has not been sanded, buffed or corrected in anyway. Full grain leather is the strongest, finest grade of leather made from the outer most part of the hide, therefore showing any wrinkles and marks. Over time these marks are enhanced by wear and develop a rich, unique patina.

Goatskin: Skin from a mature goat.

Grain: The texture and pattern of a hide’s surface.

Lambskin: Skin from a lamb or young sheep.

Leather: The skin of an animal that has been treated, dressed and preserved.

Patina: The resulting appearance of leather over time. Knicks, scrapes, bumps, friction and pressure, oils coming to the surface and receding, all cumulatively give each piece of leather a unique appearance.

Skiving: Slicing, shaving, or splitting leather into a thin layer, especially in areas where pliability is desired without weakening the leather.

Split Grain: When splitting the leather, two pieces are created: the top grain, and the split grain, which is the lower, weaker half of the hide. Often times this leather is pigmented and embossed to imitate full grain leather.

Suede: The buffing process used on split leather, which creates a nap.

Tannery: The place in which animal hides are tanned and processed.

Tannin: Astringent substances of plant origin used in tanning leather.

Tanning: The treatment of animal skins that prevents decomposition, as well as increases durability. This process permanently changes the protein structure in the hide, and can take between 6 hours and 2 days.

Top Grain: Typically used to describe the outermost leather of a hide, when the hide has been split. Often, top grain leather has had the original grain removed and an imitation grain embossed into the surface, both minimizing blemishes and increasing color uniformity. This also creates a lighter, more consistent leather that is easier to clean.

Vegetable Tanning: The application of tannins, derived from tree bark and other plants, to animal hides to create a firm and strong leather, as opposed to chrome tanned leather, which uses non-plant derived chemicals to treat the hides.